Guantánamo Public Memory Project Collections Internship, Spring/Summer 2014

About the Guantánamo Public Memory Project

The Guantánamo Public Memory Project (GPMP) is a national multi-media project that seeks to build public awareness of the long history of the US naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and foster dialogue on its possible futures and the policies it shapes. Steered from Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights, the Project has brought together 13 national universities and their community partners to create a traveling exhibitweb platform, and series of public dialogues on the base’s history from 1898 to the present.  Student teams worked with individuals who worked, lived, served, or were held on the base, and collaborated across geographical, cultural, and political context to produce this exhibit, opening dialogue on the difficult questions it raises. Each student-community team developed one of 13 exhibit panels, which together are now traveling across the country to each of the communities that created them, with public programs hosted in each place. The exhibit opened in December 2012 at New York University’s Kimmel Windows Gallery and is booked through the end of 2014 at 12 other institutions.

The GPMP team is currently working with Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library to build the publicly accessible Guantánamo Public Memory Project Collection archive, which is housed at the university’s Center for Human Rights Documentation & Research. The Project’s digital material is housed by the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), a partnership between the University of Florida and Florida International University. The collections include documents, photographs, audio and video interviews, and other material about GTMO, documenting the social history of everyday life on the base at different moments as well as periods of crisis and conflict.  The material is being donated on an ongoing basis by individuals across the country with diverse experience at GTMO.  

About the Internship

The Guantánamo Public Memory Project collections internship is an exciting opportunity to gain hands-on and specialized experience researching, developing, digitizing and cataloging collections. In particular, the GPMP collections intern will work with Project staff to:

 

  • Build digital collection on dLOC by uploading all Project’s current digital holdings and creating metadata; 
  • Build physical archive with Columbia Rare Books and Manuscripts library, working closely with Columbia’s Center for Human Rights Documentation and Research Librarians;
  • Identify and liaise with potential donors and oral history candidates from Project database of over 300 people with direct experience at GTMO and incorporate new materials into both collections;
  • Maintain internal archive of Project materials (e.g. photographs, event programs) from each exhibit venue;
  • Promote collections via blog, social media and related digital platforms;
  • Perform additional related research and outreach as needed. 

 

Qualifications

  • Ability to commit at least 10 hours/week for at least one semester
  • Graduate student in library science, museum studies, history, or related field
  • Experience with archival processing and knowledge of digitization standards and technology
  • Background in one or more subject areas related to GTMO’s history, such as 19th/early 20th century American imperialism, Caribbean studies, refugee policy, military history, Cold War
  • Excellent organization skills and ability to work independently and creatively

How to Apply

Please send resume and cover letter to Julia Thomas at jat453@nyu.edu with the subject “GPMP Collections Intern” by February 14, 2014.

 Please note this is an unpaid position, but can be taken for academic credit if permitted by institution/department.

 

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