Category Archives: Conferences

Digital Frontiers conference at Rice in September featuring Draper’s own Kimon Keramidas

In September, Rice University will be hosting a conference that explores the intersections of digital public humanities and cultural heritage. Draper Associate Director Kimon Keramidas will be giving a talk with Alex Gil: Of Institutions, Initiatives, and the Importance of Regional Academic Communities: Building NYCDH.

Register now for Digital Frontiers 2016. They are celebrating their 5th Anniversary at Rice University with Keynote Speakers Roopika Risam (Salem State University) and Patrick Meier (author, Digital Humanitarians). Join them September 22-24, 2016.

Click here to register now!

Opening Keynote

Burning Down the Tent: New Futures for Social Justice and Digital Humanities

Roopika Risam (Salem State University)

Closing Keynote

From I, Robot to WeRobotics: Humanitarian Robotics in Action

Patrick Meier

(WeRobotics & Humanitarian UAV Network; author, Digital Humanitarians)

The diverse program includes workshops on digital pedagogy, making coloring books from digital archives, and using MOUs to manage projects, along with panels, papers, and posters by 59 presenters representing 27 institutions in 8 US states.

They’re also partnering with the Texas Digital Humanities Consortium and the Resilient Networks to Support Inclusive Digital Humanities initiative for a THATCamp on Saturday, September 24! Registration for THATCamp Digital Frontiers is free, but limited to the first 50 registrants. Visit http://digitalfrontiers2016.thatcamp.org/ to register.

Registration for Digital Frontiers closes September 9.

For more information, please visit the website, email digtalfrontiers[at]unt.edu, join the Facebook Group, and follow @DigiFront and #DF16RU on Twitter.

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Draper Student Maria Slautina on Attending the Fifth Biennial French Graduate Conference “Authority and Authorship” at Johns Hopkins University

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In October I attended the Fifth Biennial French Graduate Conference “Authority and Authorship” at Johns Hopkins University. My background in medieval French literature and authorship lead me to an interest in global medievalism, and as a result, in global comparative literature. It can be very illuminating to explore how people with different backgrounds and histories deal with the same problems. In the paper I presented, I looked into how Russian author Andrei Makine and Japanese author Akira Mizubayashi resolve problems of authority while writing in French, a foreign language for both. I wanted to understand what lead them each to chose French as their adopted language, and how this choice then influenced their voice as authors.

Though this research fits within the field of literature, it’s also close to the art history project that I have been developing during my studies at Draper. I’m exploring the notion of creativity in the context of contemporary societies in flux. How much relevance is there today for the idea of national arts, music and literature? How do we define an artist who is born in one country, grows up in another, and is creatively active in a third? How does the act of moving abroad or traveling between different places influence creativity? Finally, what does travel do to previously conventional perspectives? Do people start to create because of the experience of migration, perhaps as a way to deal with discomfort or anxiety? Or are they inspired by new acquaintances? How do the new forms of creativity influence actual art spaces and museums?

At the conference I was pleased to find myself in a thriving community of young scholars from around the world. Canadian, French, Australian and American graduate students and researchers came together for fascinating discussions about authorship, translation and the figure of the author in a wide range of disciplines.

Call for Papers: UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

CFPs: UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Bergman
(Ingmar Bergman’s 1966 film Persona)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

In keeping with recent critical attention to the history of the passions and the body, we are interested in the aesthetic representation – literary, visual, and oral – of love madness. How are these extreme states represented in literature and art? Where is the line drawn between passionate love and mad love? How has the representation of love and/or/as madness changed over time? What effect have these representations had on real-world treatment of the mentally ill? And how is space left for mad love as a positive force, if at all?

This year’s UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Conference will explore the many manifestations of mad love in literature and cultural history. We invite graduate students to present papers on related issues. Topics on the intersections between social conceptions and artistic depictions of love and madness might include, but are not restricted to:

● Love as a disease
● Love, madness, and psychoanalysis
● Bodies performing desire
● Love, madness, and identity
● Gendering desire and/or madness
● Love, madness, and violence
● Monstrous love
● Creative production/inspiration and love/madness
● The role of the sensory in love and madness
● Mental Health and Human Rights

We are open to papers in all disciplines and treating material from all time periods. In addition to conventional panel presentations, we will offer performances and film screenings; interactive workshops on topics such as the history of psychiatry and an introduction to translation; and discussion sections on pre-circulated materials (primary and/or secondary).

Submission Guidelines:
Please submit your 250-300 word proposal/abstract and a CV to ucla.complit.conf@gmail.com by Monday, September 21st. Kindly mention “Submission: CLGraduate Conference” in the subject of the e-mail. All submissions should include the title of the paper, the abstract, and the name, affiliation, and contact information of the author. Please specify whether you are interested in (a) presenting a paper or (b) presenting/performing a creative work. If you are proposing a creative work, please specify any A/V needs and the length of the presentation.

Further information is available on the conference website at uclacomplitconf.com. For any additional queries, please contact ucla.complit.conf[at]gmail.com.

Panel Series / “The Magazine as Medium,” with Lori Cole, Kim Conaty, Hal Foster, Dan Fox, Ruth Graham, Silvia Kolbowski, Carey Snyder, Lorin Stein, and Betsy Sussler

Dates: 9 April, 11 May, and 18 June 2015; 7–9 pm
Location:
Cabinet, 300 Nevins Street, Brooklyn (map and directions here)
FREE
. No RSVP necessary
Organized by Lori Cole

Please join us for a three-part series exploring the interview, the questionnaire, and the letter to the editor—three frequently overlooked forms that are nevertheless constitutive of many magazines. Each of these genres serves as a site of interaction between editors, contributors, and readers and is often used to assert or reinforce a magazine’s platform. The series will contextualize the development of each seemingly minor form and investigate its present uses in order to consider the role that it has had in articulating the identity of print publications across history.

For more information about the event, click here.

Threesis applications — get yours today!

Draperites!

It’s the most wonderful time of the year — the Threesis Application Period!
For the uninitiated, the GSAS Threesis Academic Challenge is an annual event where MA students compete for cash prizes by giving three-minute “compelling orations” on their research, with only one slide for visuals.
The event happens in April. Top prize is $1000, second place and audience favorite each bag $750, and any Draper student who makes it to the final round gets $300 from us. And we have a pretty good track record, just saying.
The application itself can also be found on our forms page, or you can pick up a hard copy in the Draper office, by the coffeemaker.
Applications are due Friday, Februrary 6.
Get at it!