Tag Archives: Colloquiums

Extended Deadline: NYU CALC "Networked New York," Mar. 9, 2012 (deadline Jan. 5)

“Networked New York” – call for papers


The Colloquium in American Literature and Culture at New York University invites proposals for our 2012 spring conference, “Networked New York.” This symposium will take place on Friday, March 9, 2012, and will feature a keynote address by Marvin Taylor, Director of Fales Library & Special Collections and founder of the Downtown New York Collection.

We envision this conference as a forum for examining systems of interrelation among writers and artists who live, work, commune, and clash in New York City, whether physical New York (the city’s buildings, streetscapes, neighborhoods), digitized New York (its blogs, websites, tweets), or institutional New York (its libraries, archives, museums). We aim to enable discussion about literary, artistic, and intellectual coteries in New York – past and present – and to consider the influence of such communities on the cultural production the city generates as well as on the city itself. To these ends, we hope to include papers from a range of historical and disciplinary contexts.

Our keynote panel will probe the specific concerns that the geographies and institutional landscapes of New York City bring to bear on archives and collecting in both contemporary and historical contexts. To this end, we also seek papers that may address similar subjects, particularly radical archives in New York and/or key strategies for making and using contemporary archives in the city. How does one address the archival presence or absence of certain communities or spaces in New York City?

Other potential paper topics include but are not limited to explorations of the following:

– Neighborhood dynamics and artistic communities


– Collaborations among artists, writers, readers, viewers


- Circulation of ideas and materials


– New York street life and material culture


– Urban space and identity


- Sites, scenes, and modes of interaction


– Digital media and the city

Please send a brief CV and abstract, 300-500 words in length, to Annie Abrams and Blevin Shelnutt atnyucalc@gmail.com by January 5, 2012. Please direct any questions about the conference to this address.

Foucault Society Colloquium: Wednesday, 12/14

The Foucault Society, NYC
2011 Colloquium Series: New Research in Foucault Studies

Our popular Colloquium Series continues next week! We are delighted to invite you to another evening of critical dialogue and light refreshment. Join the discussion, celebrate the end of the semester and find out how you can help shape the Foucault Society’s agenda for 2012. All are welcome.

Dominique E. Johnson, Ph.D.

“Critical Dilemmas and Methodological Regimes: Toward a Genealogy of an Empirical Borderland”

Wednesday, December 14, 2011
7:30-9:30pm

CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue, Room 5409
New York, NY

Abstract:
This paper engages in a Foucaultian critique of quantitative methodologies. Situating Foucault’s discussions of the carceral society and regimes of verification in the context of work by Patricia Hill Collins and Sandra Harding, I examine the dilemmas that emerge when using critical theory to frame quantitative social research. The paper looks carefully at the silencing of intersectional identities that often occurs when quantitative data is used for the construction, maintenance and representation of social identities, and argues that these dilemmas challenge us to expand our conceptualizations of what it is to do quantitative research, particularly for intersectional analysis. Engaging both the risks and opportunities that arise from seeking to enter the quantitative matrix, the paper concludes by considering the various implications of living and working in the empirical borderlands while making a critical intervention into existing methodological regimes.

Speaker bio:
Dominique Johnson (Ph.D., Urban Education, Temple University) is Assistant Professor of Law and Society and a member of the Women and Gender Studies convening group in the School of Social Science and Human Services at Ramapo College of New Jersey. Dr. Johnson is currently the Chair of the American Democracy Project at Ramapo College.

About the Colloquium Series:
The Foucault Society’s Colloquium Series provides a forum for new research and works-in-progress, and offers an opportunity for both junior and senior scholars to share new work with a friendly and supportive audience of colleagues.

Open to the public. All are welcome. We will have wine and snacks. Suggested donation: $5.

RSVPs are appreciated. E-mail: foucaultsocietyorg@gmail.com.

**As part of our ongoing fundraiser, we will have hardcover copies of Foucault’s book, The Government of Self and Others: Lectures at the College de France, 1982-1983 (Palgrave, 2010), available for purchase.**

About the Foucault Society:
The Foucault Society is an independent, nonprofit educational organization offering a variety of forums dedicated to the critical study of the ideas of Michel Foucault (1926-1984). All of our events are open to the public. We welcome new participants who have an interest in Foucault’s work and its impact on diverse areas of inquiry, including critical social theory, philosophy, politics, history, culture, gender/sexuality studies, and the arts.

Website: www.foucaultsociety.org

Twitter: @foucaultsociety

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/foucaultsociety/

E-mail: foucaultsocietyorg@gmail.com

For directions to the CUNY Graduate Center, please see: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/About-the-GC/Building-Particulars/Building-Access.

Oct 21 Colloquium: "Arts of Resistance: Locating Black Women’s Philosophies"

The Foucault Society, NYC
201
1 Colloquium Series: New Research in Foucault Studies

Devonya N. Havis, Ph.D. “Arts of Resistance: Locating Black Women’s Philosophies”

We are delighted to announce our first colloquium of this academic year. Please join us for an evening of critical dialogue and light refreshment.

Friday, October 21, 2011
7:00-9:30pm

CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue, Room 5409
New York, NY

Abstract:
This paper works through Foucault to examine the parameters within which Black women’s lived experience can be intelligible as philosophy. Toni Morrison characterizes the condition of Black women in the US as one in which they have “nothing to fall back on; not maleness, not whiteness, not ladyhood, not anything.” It is at the juncture of self-invention, which simultaneously contests and resists imposed categories, that Black women’s philosophies emerge. As opposed to a static set of philosophical principles, Black women’s philosophies are more aptly described as philosophical strategies that perform ethico-political interventions–doing philosophy from the posture of critique. In evoking the notion of “doing philosophy,” the project calls attention to philosophy as a practice, or process of habituation, whereby one develops an active critical posture in which theory and action are necessary linked. My account enlists Foucault’s analytic of subjugated knowledges, takes up his elaborations on genealogy (as outlined in Society Must Be Defended), and explores his discussions of critique and the “Aesthetics of Existence.”

Speaker bio:
Devonya N. Havis
(Ph.D., Boston College) is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. Her research engages contemporary continental philosophy with critical race theory to promote social justice. Her current work develops a conception of auditory identity as a counter to the longstanding philosophical emphasis on the visual. Recent articles include “Blackness Beyond Witness” in Philosophy and Social Criticism (2010). Courses she teaches range from introduction to traditional Western philosophical concepts to explorations of the political implications of Hip-Hop theory. She is the Conference Site Coordinator for the Foucault Circle’s 2012 Annual Meeting, taking place in Buffalo on March 30-April 1.

About the Colloquium Series:
The Foucault Society’s Colloquium Series provides a forum for new research and works-in-progress, and offers an opportunity for both junior and senior scholars to share new work with a friendly and supportive audience of colleagues.

Open to the public. RSVPs are appreciated. E-mail: foucaultsocietyorg@gmail.com.

**As part of our on-going fundraiser, we will have Foucault’s The Government of Self and Others: Lectures at the College de France, 1982-1983 (Palgrave, 2010) available for purchase.**

About the Foucault Society:
The Foucault Society is an independent, nonprofit educational organization offering a variety of forums dedicated to the critical study of the ideas of Michel Foucault (1926-1984). All of our events are open to the public. We welcome new participants who have an interest in Foucault’s work and its impact on diverse areas of inquiry, including critical social theory, philosophy, politics, history, culture, gender/sexuality studies, and the arts.

Website: www.foucaultsociety.org

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/foucaultsociety/

E-mail: foucaultsocietyorg@gmail.com

For directions to the CUNY Graduate Center, please see: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/About-the-GC/Building-Particulars/Building-Access.

American Literature & Culture: 10/25 Colloquium

The New York University

Colloquium in American Literature and Culture

presents


Ahab’s Wife and Lear’s Fool: Contemporary Publishing and the Symbolic Capital of the Canon

A talk by Jeremy Rosen of the University of Chicago


Objectifying the Word: Religious Education and Material Culture in Nineteenth-Century Sunday-School Classrooms

A talk by John Thomas of Rutgers University


Tuesday, October 25

13-19 University Place, Great Room

New York University

6:00 p.m.

All are welcome!

Refreshments will be served.

Comp Lit Colloquium on Archives: April 22

Please join us for the April installment of the NYU Comparative Literature Colloquium Series

Friday, 4/22, from 3-5 p.m. in 19 University Place, room 222


“Staging Archives”
Professor Cristina Vatulescu,
Departments of Comparative Literature, Russian & Slavic Studies
“East European Secret Police Archives: Reading Dilemmas”
&
Professor Peter Nicholls,
Department of English
“Living with the George Oppen Archive”




Reception to follow.





Cristina Vatulescu received her Ph.D in Comparative Literature from Harvard in 2005 and came to NYU after a year as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. Her first book, Police Aesthetics: Literature, Film and The Secret Police, a study of the relationships between cultural and policing practices in twentieth century Eastern Europe, was recently published by Stanford University Press. Taking advantage of the partial opening of the secret police archives in Russia and Romania, Police Aesthetics focuses on their most infamous holdings-the personal files-as well as on the agency’s less known involvement with cinema. Two articles stemming from this project, “Arresting Biographies: The Secret Police File in The Soviet Union and Romania,” and “Politics of Estrangement: Tracking Shklovsky’s Device in Literary and Policing Practices” have been published in Comparative Literature and Poetics Today. Vatulescu’s current project is a crosscultural exploration of the interplay of documents and fictions in twentieth century literature, cinema, as well as in legal texts and practices.


Peter Nicholls has published widely on twentieth-century writing, with recent works including Modernisms: A Literary Guide (2nd ed. 2008) and George Oppen and the Fate of Modernism (2009). He is especially interested in connections between American and European poetry, and in the political and economic dimensions of literary texts. Nicholls arrived at NYU in 2009 after many years at the University of Sussex, where he was Professor of English and American Literature and editor of the journal Textual Practice.

For more information: http://comparatorium.wordpress.com/