Tag Archives: CUNY

Call for Papers – Thinking Serially Conference, 4/23-24

Thinking Serially: Repetition, Continuation, and Adaptation

An Interdisciplinary Conference

Amidst the advent of quality television, the proliferation of sequels, remakes, and adaptations in Hollywood, and the endless and growing forms of reproduction of media made possible by modern technology, the notion of seriality has perhaps never been more important than today. From the re-invention of Orphic and Faustian legends to the serialization of the novel form, the phenomenon of seriality has been present throughout Western literature. In the last two decades, we have seen a rise in the production of sophisticated, narratively complex television, from The Sopranos to Mad Men and Breaking Bad. The serial has become a dominant form of media entertainment, often rivaling the more classically elevated genre of film. Invoking questions of succession and context, both temporal and spatial, our inquiry into the nature of the series in media and literature seeks to understand the dynamic relations of fragments and totalities, parts and wholes.

The Department of Comparative Literature at The Graduate Center, CUNY presents a conference on seriality in literature, theory, and media to be held April 23 and 24, 2015.

This conference asks: how do we understand serials differently from other works (e.g., the serialized novel versus the epic)? How does seriality speak to the act of binging and the notion of deferred satisfaction, the suspension of expectation, and the manipulation of the spectator? What does seriality tell us about re-readings? How do we understand the relationship between seriality and history?

Thinking Serially: Repetition, Continuation, and Adaptation

An Interdisciplinary Conference

We invite papers whose approaches and methods come from a broad spectrum of disciplines and fields, including psychology/psychoanalysis; literature, media, gender, and post-colonial studies; economic theories; intellectual history; art history and architecture; linguistics and musicology.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

·       Serialization of the novel; how seriality affects a particular genre or complicates genre theory
·       Issues raised by spinoffs, sequels, farces, and/or parodies
·       The work of art in the age of the digital platform
·       Repetition compulsions
·       Periodization and anthologizing
·       Cultural appropriation
·       Serialization and historical analysis
·       The relationships between objects and impressions, images, and memories
·       Genres with many iterations: science fiction; vampires; serial killers and crime dramas

Please submit a 300-word abstract for a 15-20 minute paper by January 15, 2015 to thinkingserially@gmail.com. Proposals should include the title of the paper, presenter’s name, institutional and departmental affiliation, and any technology requests. We also welcome panel proposals of three to four papers.

Impression & Object Conference – March 28 – Graduate Center, CUNY

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

 
Join us on Friday, March 28 at the Graduate Center, CUNY for our third annual Critical Theory Conference, hosted by the Department of Comparative Literature, with Keynote talk by Professor Joshua Landy of Stanford University. For complete conference program and more, visit us at http://impressionobjectconference.wordpress.com and at https://www.facebook.com/events/607345432680455 . 
 
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CFP Deadline Extended: CUNY Graduate Center Department of Comparative Literature

Deadline Extended: Abstracts for the Impression & Object critical theory conference, hosted by the Department of Comparative Literature at the City University of New York, are now due on Friday, February 14. For more information, please visit http://impressionobjectconference.wordpress.com 
 

 

Impression and Object

A Conference on Critical Theory

Keynote Speaker: Joshua Landy (Stanford University)

 

All experiences are moral experiences, even in the realm of sense perception. – Nietzsche, The Gay Science

 

The students of the Department of Comparative Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center present the third annual interdisciplinary conference on literary and critical theory to be held Friday, March 28, 2014. This conference is being given in celebration of the launch of the CUNY Graduate Center’s Certificate for Critical Theory, dedicated to the study of literary and critical theory.

This conference aims to explore and interrogate questions regarding the effects of conceptualizations of Mind, from the psychological to the metaphysical, on perception, expression, and selfhood. Specifically, it will focus on cognitive interactions between subject and object and aesthetic representations of these interactions, as well as the influence that these questions, interactions, and representations have had on literary and critical theory.

We invite papers from all disciplines centering upon any individual theorist, period, or school of critical theory that explore questions of perception, reasoning, and its ethics and aesthetics, as well as the effects that these have on self-fashioning, especially as they pertain to literary and critical theory. We welcome comparisons of various theoretical approaches, including, but not limited to, literary theory, psychoanalysis, philosophy, gender studies, psychology, and political theory. Some of the questions this conference seeks to answer include, but are not limited to:

  • How does reading and/or the experience of aesthetics affect us, whether morally, interpersonally, politically, or relating to questions of self-awareness, etc.?

  • How has the representation of mind changed throughout history and across disciplines?

  • In what ways does art inform our own experience of our minds and the way we perceive the minds of others? Is selfhood a product of aesthetic experience? What are the problems inherent in theoretical frameworks that present it as such?

  • How do specific processes of cognition, such as pattern recognition or memory recall, relate to creative processes, such as metaphor or prolepsis?

  • What are the consequences of different perceptions of mind between cultures? How have conceptualizations of mind informed relations of power in imperialist and post-colonial cultures?

  • In attributing certain beliefs and thoughts to others, how do we shape our perceptions of reality and ourselves? What happens when we doubt or lack faith in these attributions?

  • How does the interpretative impulse affect one’s experiences of art and literature?

  • How does mind govern space, and space govern mind?

  • How have conceptualizations of so-called mental disturbances (schizophrenia, hysteria, etc.) influenced critical methodologies?

     

Please submit a 300-word abstract for a 15-20 minute paper by February 14, 2014 (Extended Deadline) to GCCompLitConf@gmail.com. Proposals should include the title of the paper, presenter’s name, institutional and departmental affiliation, and any technology requests. We also welcome panel proposals of three to four papers.

 

This conference is co-sponsored by:

The Writers’ Institute, The Doctoral Students’ Council, and the Office of the Provost 

 

CFP: Principals of Uncertainty, CUNY Grad Center (Comp Lit): Abstracts Due 3/1

“Principles of Uncertainty”
A Conference on Critical Theory
Keynote Speaker: Martin Hägglund

The students of the Department of Comparative Literature at the City University of New York Graduate Center present the first annual interdisciplinary conference on literary and critical theory to be held Friday, May 4, 2012. This conference is being given in support of the CUNY Graduate Center’s proposed certificate for Critical Theory, which is dedicated to the study of literary and critical theory.

We invite papers from all disciplines focusing on works from any period that explore the theme of uncertainty as it pertains to literary and critical theory.
This conference welcomes papers centering upon any individual theorist, period, or school of critical theory, as well as comparisons of various theoretical approaches, including, but not limited to literary theory, psychoanalysis, philosophy, gender studies, and political theory. Some of the questions this conference seeks to answer include, but are not limited to:

• How is the meaning of a text uncertain?
• Is this uncertainty purposefully placed within a text or a by-product of the act of reading?
• How is this uncertainty demonstrated in the relationship between author and reader?
• How can uncertainty be understood not only with respect to literature but in ethical, gendered, political, and/or social terms?
• How is identity shown to be uncertain?
• How does an “undecidable” future impact present ethical and political actions?
• How is history (whether of language, narrative, and/or society) destabilized and called into question?
• How does language contribute to the uncertainty of meaning and interpretation?
• How does the theorist’s own writing present the reader with an example of uncertainty?
• How does uncertainty function in the methodologies of interpretation and the making of meaning?
• Can a text have a stable meaning or is it always uncertain?

Please submit a 300 word abstract for a 15-20 minute paper by March 1, 2012 to uncertaintyconference2012@gmail.com. Proposals should include the title of the paper, presenter’s name, institutional and departmental affiliation, and any technology requests. We also welcome panel proposals of three to four papers.

This conference is co-sponsored by:

The Writer’s Institute at the City University of New York Graduate Center: an un-MFA program devoted to bringing together the country’s most talented writers and today’s most celebrated editors.

The Doctoral Students’ Council: the sole policymaking body representing students in doctoral and master’s programs at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Oct 21 Colloquium: "Arts of Resistance: Locating Black Women’s Philosophies"

The Foucault Society, NYC
201
1 Colloquium Series: New Research in Foucault Studies

Devonya N. Havis, Ph.D. “Arts of Resistance: Locating Black Women’s Philosophies”

We are delighted to announce our first colloquium of this academic year. Please join us for an evening of critical dialogue and light refreshment.

Friday, October 21, 2011
7:00-9:30pm

CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue, Room 5409
New York, NY

Abstract:
This paper works through Foucault to examine the parameters within which Black women’s lived experience can be intelligible as philosophy. Toni Morrison characterizes the condition of Black women in the US as one in which they have “nothing to fall back on; not maleness, not whiteness, not ladyhood, not anything.” It is at the juncture of self-invention, which simultaneously contests and resists imposed categories, that Black women’s philosophies emerge. As opposed to a static set of philosophical principles, Black women’s philosophies are more aptly described as philosophical strategies that perform ethico-political interventions–doing philosophy from the posture of critique. In evoking the notion of “doing philosophy,” the project calls attention to philosophy as a practice, or process of habituation, whereby one develops an active critical posture in which theory and action are necessary linked. My account enlists Foucault’s analytic of subjugated knowledges, takes up his elaborations on genealogy (as outlined in Society Must Be Defended), and explores his discussions of critique and the “Aesthetics of Existence.”

Speaker bio:
Devonya N. Havis
(Ph.D., Boston College) is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. Her research engages contemporary continental philosophy with critical race theory to promote social justice. Her current work develops a conception of auditory identity as a counter to the longstanding philosophical emphasis on the visual. Recent articles include “Blackness Beyond Witness” in Philosophy and Social Criticism (2010). Courses she teaches range from introduction to traditional Western philosophical concepts to explorations of the political implications of Hip-Hop theory. She is the Conference Site Coordinator for the Foucault Circle’s 2012 Annual Meeting, taking place in Buffalo on March 30-April 1.

About the Colloquium Series:
The Foucault Society’s Colloquium Series provides a forum for new research and works-in-progress, and offers an opportunity for both junior and senior scholars to share new work with a friendly and supportive audience of colleagues.

Open to the public. RSVPs are appreciated. E-mail: foucaultsocietyorg@gmail.com.

**As part of our on-going fundraiser, we will have Foucault’s The Government of Self and Others: Lectures at the College de France, 1982-1983 (Palgrave, 2010) available for purchase.**

About the Foucault Society:
The Foucault Society is an independent, nonprofit educational organization offering a variety of forums dedicated to the critical study of the ideas of Michel Foucault (1926-1984). All of our events are open to the public. We welcome new participants who have an interest in Foucault’s work and its impact on diverse areas of inquiry, including critical social theory, philosophy, politics, history, culture, gender/sexuality studies, and the arts.

Website: www.foucaultsociety.org

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/foucaultsociety/

E-mail: foucaultsocietyorg@gmail.com

For directions to the CUNY Graduate Center, please see: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/About-the-GC/Building-Particulars/Building-Access.