Tag Archives: Films

Memory: Silence, Screen and Spectacle Conference at New School, 3/24 – 3/26

The Center for Public Scholarship at The New School recommends…

the Fourth Annual New School Interdisciplinary Memory Conference:
Memory: Silence, Screen and Spectacle

March 24-26, 2011

The New School for Social Research, New York City

Speakers Include:

Marianne Hirsch, Susannah Radstone, Diana Taylor,

Yael Hersonski, Dirk Moses, William Hirst, Tom Allen,

Cynthia Milton, Daniel Levy, Louis Bickford, Jonathan Bach,

Rick Crownshaw, Susan Pearce, and many others

For information on the 2011 conference visit

www.newschool.edu/nssr/subpage.aspx?id=57135

or email nssrmemoryconference@gmail.com

An Introduction to Mexican Cinema: Times of Decadence (Talks & Screenings Hosted by Draper Graduate)

Recent Draper graduate Salvador Olguín (Jan. 2011) will be hosting a series of talks about the history of Mexican cinema at the Brooklyn arts space Observatory in early March. The three talks will each include a surprise film screening. For more information on the talks, please see the Observatory website at http://observatoryroom.org/2011/02/14/mexican-cinema/

An Introduction to Mexican Cinema: Times of Decadence
Lectures and Screenings with Salvador Olguín
March 1st, 8th, and 15th
8:00 PM
Observatory
543 Union Street, Brooklyn

Spawning world-renowned directors like Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Hellboy), and with Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Biutiful currently nominated for two Academy Awards, Mexico’s film industry has established a name of its own. But few people know the history of Mexican cinema, or have access to some of its early films. During this series of talks, we will provide a brief introduction to this history, show a few clips, and present screenings of films from a pivotal moment in the development of Mexican cinema: the times of decadence around the decade of 1970.

Wojnarowicz Screening & Panel, Co-Organized by Draper Student: Feb. 1

(David Wojnarowicz Photographed by Peter Hujar)

Draper student Emily Colucci has co-organized an upcoming event with Performance Studies, which will include a screening of David Wojnarowicz’s film “A Fire in My Belly” and a panel discussion. Draper students are invited to attend the event and the following reception. More details are below.

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Performance Studies Lecture Series in conjunction with the Draper Program Presents

A Fire in Our Belly: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Tuesday February 1st, 7-9pm

721 Broadway, 6th Floor, Room 612 With Marvin Taylor, Thomas Crow, Karen Finley and Leon Hilton

Artist David Wojnarowicz’s archives are housed at Fales Library and Special Collections on the third floor of Bobst Library at NYU, and the film ‘A Fire in My Belly,’ an edited version of which the National Portrait Gallery removed from its exhibition ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture,’ was on loan from Fales.

This event brings together members of the NYU community to address the myriad and ongoing issues raised by the censoring of this important work.

Reception to follow

Please visit our Facebook event listing to RSVP:

http://www.facebook.com/#!/event.php?eid=183963461625645

A Draper alumna and a film about the Nuremburg trials

Draper alumna Kym Harris is currently involved in the educational component and outreach for a film about the Nuremberg trials that will be premiere in New York next week. It sounds like something that would interest a lot of Draper students, and we definitely love hearing from our alumn! All the info is below.

“Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today” is a documentary that was produced in 1948 for the War Department & U.S. Military Government by the filmmakers who had collected the Nazi footage that was used by the prosecution in the trials. It was shown widely in Germany in 1948/49 as part of the U.S. de-Nazification campaign, but because of Marshall Plan politics was never shown in the U.S.A. or in any other country.

Over the years, the original picture negative and sound elements were lost or destroyed.

Now, more than 60 years later, the newly restored film can be seen around the world for the first time.

It is truly a message in a bottle – a film of great historic value that also has a striking contemporary resonance. The film ends with Justice Jackson’s stirring words: “Let Nuremberg stand as a warning to all who plan and wage aggressive war.”

It has been shown in The Hague, Berlin, Toronto, and Uganda, and will be shown in Iran, Guatemala, Washington D.C., California, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Warsaw, and elsewhere in 2010/11. It will be playing in New York City for one week only. It is premiering at the New York Film Festival on September 28 (Sold Out) and will run:

Sept 29 – Oct 5, at Film Forum Cinema, 209 West Houston Street, New York, NY 10014 Tel: (212) 727-8110 Showtimes Daily: 1:00 2:45 4:30 6:15 8:00 10:00

Online ticket purchase: www.filmforum.org

Non-profit/educational/synagogue group rate available: $6 per ticket for groups of 12 or more. To book group sales: joffre@filmforum.org or call (212) 727-8110

For more information, including the fascinating story behind the film, go to:

www.nurembergfilm.org

Free Summer Film Series: Weimar on Screen

Draper graduate Leah Ammon now works at the Neue Galerie Museum, which is curating a free film series this summer called “Weimar on Screen.” Leah thought the series might be of interest to Draper students. Some information on the series is below, but film descriptions and further information is available on the Neue Galerie website, here: http://www.neuegalerie.org/programs/film-series

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NEUE GALERIE NEW YORK ANNOUNCES
FREE SUMMER FILM SERIES
“WEIMAR ON SCREEN”

This summer, the Neue Galerie presents the film series “Weimar on Screen.” The tumultuous years of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933) were a time of far-reaching social, political, and cultural upheaval. In spite of this turmoil, they brought about a flowering of art and culture in Germany, particularly in cinema. The films in this series are brilliant examples of Weimar-era filmmaking, and they illuminate aspects of the culture of the period.

Films are presented to the public free of charge on Mondays at 4 p.m. in Café Fledermaus. For more information about Neue Galerie programming, please visit our website at http://www.neuegalerie.org/programs.