Tag Archives: Gender Politics

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“‘Flame On!’: Nuclear Families, Unstable Molecules, and the Queer History of The Fantastic Four”: A Lecture by Ramzi Fawaz- February 2

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Annette Gordon-Reed at the Diana Center 3/24 -Without Cover of the Law: Writing the History of Enslaved Women

Annette Gordon-Reed
 
Tuesday, March 24, 6:30 PM
Event Oval, Diana Center
Barnard College
3009 Broadway @ 117th St.
 

Drawing on her work about slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, luminary legal historian Annette Gordon-Reed will discuss the way law influences the portrayal of enslaved women and their families. Annette Gordon-Reed is the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School, and a Professor of History at Harvard University. She received the 2008 National Book Award and the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in History for The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. She is also the author of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy, among other titles. Her honors include the National Humanities Medal, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a MacArthur Fellowship. This year’s lecture is in honor of Barnard Professor of History (and longtime BCRW Advisory Board member), Herbert Sloan, author of Principle and Interest: Thomas Jefferson and the Problem of Debt.

 
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Emma Heaney Speaking at CSGS February 10!

Draper Faculty Fellow Emma Heaney will be giving a lecture on Tuesday, February 10 at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality:

Half-Sisters, Radical Queens, Lesbian Separatists, & Non-Men: Second Wave Trans Feminism

a lecture by Emma Heaney

February 10, Tuesday
6:30 to 8 pm

Emma Heaney, Draper Program, New York University

Respondent: Margaux L. Kristjansson, Anthropology, Columbia University

This talk moves off from archival documents of trans feminist political thought and struggle in the 1970s to suggest how trans feminist thought and practice — both “then and now” — can clarify two points that stalled 1970s feminist projects: (1) how can we be liberated “as women” when it is precisely the historical content of “woman” we seek to escape, and (2) can woman operate as a political category when women’s experiences are so vastly different according to race, class, and cis versus trans experience? Rather than a queer transcendence of the term “woman,” trans feminism of the 70s and today teaches that the violent enforcement of womanhood on cis women and the violent prohibition of this identity from male assigned at birth people are the twinned processes that produce the revolutionary collectivity that fights back against misogynist violence.

Humanities Initiative Conference Room
20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor


This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair accessible.

For more information about this event, please contact the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality at 212-992-9540 or csgs(at)nyu.edu.

Call For Papers: Religion Interruptus: The Affects of Sex, Politics, and Bodies Graduate Student Conference, Syracuse University February 27-March 1

The Religion Graduate Organization at Syracuse University is proud to announce our 2015 Graduate Conference “Religion Interruptus: The Affects of Sex, Politics, and Bodies” featuring Keynote speaker Lynne Huffer. The conference will be held February 27 through March 1 at Syracuse University.

Call for Papers Deadline: Jan 10th, 2015

The Religion Graduate Organization invites you to submit paper and panel proposals to the semi-annual Religion Graduate Conference, Religion Interruptus: The Affects of Sex, Politics, and Bodies. This conference aims at actively encouraging interdisciplinary ways to view and examine the related encounters of sex, religion, politics, and bodies. Specifically, this conference aims to think about what occurs, and why, when religion seems to “interrupt” or “impose” upon the broader philosophical and theoretical discourses relating to bodies, politics, and sex. We invite both M.A. and Ph.D. students to submit abstracts from a variety of thematic and theoretical backgrounds.

Keynote: Lynne Huffer, Emory University

We particularly invite papers on the following themes:

  • The methodological impact of Michel Foucault when dealing with sex, religion, affect, bodies, or materiality
  • Affect theory and its relationship to sex, bodies, and religion
  • How religion and sex are portrayed in visual media and culture, and the resulting political effects
  • How political thought is changed and reimagined through discourses of sex, bodies, emotions, and affects
  • When religion seems to interrupt and impose upon broader theoretical discourses
  • Religion disrupting sex
  • Sex disrupting religion.
  • BDSM
  • Religious Experience
  • Queer theory and religion
  • Queer theory and ecology
  • Eco-theology
  • Feminism
  • Gender
  • Politics
  • Social Science

Abstracts are welcomed from a variety of fields and disciplines, including but not limited to:

  • Anthropology
  • Art History
  • Art and Visual Culture
  • Cultural Studies
  • English
  • Gender Studies
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
  • Political Science
  • Queer Studies
  • Religion
  • Sex and Sexuality Studies
  • Sociology
  • Theology

Panel submissions are greatly encouraged.

A panel should consist of 3 papers

ideally a panel should include scholars from more than one institution

We are especially looking for 1-2 panels on Are the Lips a Grave? and Mad For Foucault.

Panel or paper proposals should contain the following items:

  • A one-page abstract (350 words for papers; 500 words for panels) describing the nature of the paper or panel. No names or institutional information should appear on the abstract to facilitate a blind selection process.
  • Current CV for the participant(s).
  • Cover page which includes the name(s), institution(s), and contact information for participant(s)
  • For panel proposals, identity the primary contact person for the panel.
  • Submit all materials to SUReligionConference@gmail.com

Abstracts, comments, and questions may be sent to SUReligionConference@gmail.com.

A copy of the call for papers and additional information may be found at: http://religionconference.syr.edu/

October 14: TAKING OFFENSE: Trigger Warnings & the Neoliberal Politics of Endangerment

Taking Offense: Trigger Warnings & the Neoliberal Politics of Endangerment

a panel discussion with Lisa Duggan, Jack Halberstam, Tavia Nyong’o, Ann PellegriniAvgi Saketopoulou, & Karen Shimakawa

October 14, Tuesday
6:30 to 8:15

Lisa Duggan, Social & Cultural Analysis, New York University
Jack Halberstam, American Studies & Ethnicity, Gender Studies, Comparative Literature, and English, USC Dornsife
Tavia Nyong’o, Performance Studies, New York University
Ann Pellegrini, Performance Studies and Social & Cultural Analysis, New York University
Avgi Saketopoulou, Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, New York University
Moderated by Karen Shimakawa, Performance Studies, New York University

Please note venue change:
20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor