Tag Archives: New York

Say It Ain’t Snow! How New York Battles Winter with Robin Nagle, PhD

Thursday, January 14

6:30 – 8:00 P.M.
Free; reservations required Open this link to register for this program.
NYU Lecture Hall at 19 University Place, near 8th Street
[This venue is wheelchair accessible.]

[photo credit: Robin Nagle, 2003 Presidents Day Storm]

Snow has played a surprisingly important role in shaping contemporary New York. The flakes may look pretty while they’re coming down, but a heavy snowfall can have devastating consequences.

This talk explores what it takes for New York’s Department of Sanitation, the agency in charge of snow removal, to clear the streets. Nagle will explain why the city is uniquely vulnerable to severe storms and how we dealt with snow before the era of mechanized plows. Despite the sophistication of today’s snow removal technology, much of the work requires the same tactics now as those used in centuries past.

Robin Nagle, director of NYU’s Draper Program, is Sanitation’s anthropologist-in-residence and author of the book Picking Up: On the Streets and Behind the Trucks with the Sanitation Workers of New York City (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2014)

Open this link to register for this program.

Co-sponsored with The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Internship: Waterfront Alliance

The Waterfront Alliance is seeking a social media and online communications intern to support day-to-day communications, with a specific focus on social media and online communications. This position offers an enriching and rewarding opportunity to work with a small team to convey and engage a diverse audience under the organization’s new brand (launched this past July).

Full Details Here

  20 COOPER SQUARE, 5TH FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10003

2015-16 Humanities Initiative Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship

in Partnership with the New York Council for the Humanities

APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2015

The Humanities Initiative at New York University and the New York Council for the Humanities announce the call for applications for the 2015-16 Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship.

The Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship was developed in partnership by the Humanities Initiative at NYU and the New York Council for the Humanities to bring humanities scholarship into the public realm, to encourage emerging humanities scholars to conceive of their work in relation to the public sphere, to develop skills for doing so, and to strengthen the public humanities community in New York State. The yearlong Fellowship will provide training in the methods and approaches of public scholarship and will support the exploration of the public dimensions of the Fellow’s own scholarship in partnership with a community organization that serves public audiences.

Click here to learn more about this fellowship.

Internships with the American Museum of Natural History

The North American Archaeology Department of the American Museum of Natural History offers Lab Researcher Internship positions in the North American Archaeology Lab (NAARCH Lab) for undergraduates, recent graduates, and graduate students. The interns will handle, store, and analyze a wide variety of artifacts from southeastern North America. Lab interns have the opportunity to work with faunal remains, lithics, Native American and European ceramics, Spanish colonial artifacts, and numerous other material types. Lab work typically consists of washing, cataloging, and organizing recent collections as well as data management. Additional projects have involved fine-grained sorting of excavated materials, non-destructive analysis using PXRF, and basic level artifact analysis and documentation. In addition to lab work, interns will also be considered for our ongoing fieldwork program in Georgia, USA (offered only for the fall and spring semester). Our fieldwork package offers room and board, transportation, and a monetary stipend for three weeks.

Individuals interested in joining the NAARCH Lab Internship should be highly motivated, patient, detail-oriented, and professional. Individuals who have not yet completed their junior year need not apply unless they have extensive experience that off-sets their lack of academic training. Prior archaeological experience in either the field or in the lab is not necessary but will be a factor in our selection. The application form can be found at: http://www.amnh.org/our-research/anthropology/policies-links/internship-program Remember to specify your interest in North American Archaeology on the application.

The internships are unpaid. A paid position is possible dependent on departmental funding. You may indicate your interest in a paid position on the application, but please be aware that checking only the paid position box may affect your chances. Course credit can be offered to those individuals currently enrolled in an accredited school of higher learning. The North American Archaeology Lab offers three internship sessions a year (summer, fall, and spring). The NAARCH department asks interns to commit to two or three days a week, for a period of 10 weeks per semester. The number of interns accepted varies according to the research goals per semester.

Internship Application Deadlines

• Summer Session (June to September), submit February 1 – April 1
• Fall Session (September to December), submit June 27 – August 4
• Spring Session (February to May), submit October 1 – December 1

Interested applicants must submit a resume or CV, contact information for three references, a one page statement of purpose and the completed application form. The statement of purpose should briefly outline the applicant’s prior experience in archaeology as well as their future plans within the discipline. Individuals with questions should feel free to email tblaber@amnh.org

Applications may be sent to tblaber@amnh.org or mailed to:

Thomas Blaber
Anthropology Department
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, New York 10024-5192

Call for Papers: Endings. 2014 Stony Brook CAT Department Graduate Conference

Call for Papers: 2014 Stony Brook CAT Department Graduate Conference
New York, NY
Stony Brook Manhattan
Friday, November 21, 2014

History is punctuated by endings: the end of shared certainties, the abandonment of shared practices, and death. Endings can be dramatic and spectacular: the imagined apocalypse brought about by nuclear war, global pandemic, zombie hordes, or the brimstone of God’s wrath. Similarly, we are surrounded by endings in our lives. Endings can be quiet and quotidian: films end, books end, and seminars end. As scholars, these endings are not true endings, but beginnings, because endings are horizons of experience, process, and development, the organic or evolutionary transition to a new way of being. After the end is when we begin our work, for we can only respond after something has ended. We turn off the TV. We close the book. And we begin to write.

This is also true when the endings are not literal. In the same way that we can only begin to work after something ends, it is after the end that we discover new ways of speaking, creating, and being. We speak about post-modernism and post-colonialism and post-humanism, implying that what came before has ended and we have moved on. We theorize the end of the world. We explore both the negative horizon and the productive potential of endings. This is where we invite you to take up the conversation. The graduate students of the Cultural Analysis and Theory Department at Stony Brook University invite proposals for a 2014 conference around the theme of “endings.” What happens after the end? Are endings terrifying possibilities, or are they opportunities for growth?

Possible topics include (but are not limited to) discussions on:

  • Literal endings (including the apocalypse or after)
  • “Post” designations or the ending of a time period
  • Literary forms and their endings
  • The end of discursive and/or epistemological forms
  • Any other social and cultural phenomenon that emphasize the products and practices whose lives were cut short but nevertheless are historical moments constitutive of the present.

Papers will be 20 minutes in length and will be delivered as a part of a three-person panel.

After all presenters, there will be 20 minutes for questions and discussion. Please submit abstracts to catgradconf@gmail.com by July 15th. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words and include four keywords. We also welcome panel proposals.

The conference will include panels with discussion, a keynote speaker, and a number of other events including an artist exhibition. It will be followed by a reception in the city (location TBA).