Tag Archives: Ph.D.

Planning for a Ph.D.? Get Your Application in Great Shape with Draper’s Ph. D. Application Bootcamp

April 17 and 24: Ph.D. Application Bootcamp

A multi-session workshop led by Professors Alan Itkin & Justin Jackson

Please note: Students must have attended a PhD Application Workshop to participate in the Bootcamp. Both sessions of the Bootcamp are required. 

Session One: Friday, April 17, 6-8pm
Session Two: Friday, April 24, 6-8pm
Draper Map Room

So you know that you want to get a Ph.D. You’ve attended the Ph.D. workshop at Draper and you’ve decided that academic life is right for you. Now the real fun begins.

You need to put together a great application, an application that sings your praises to admissions committees, that entices them into offering you a great admissions package. But, in order to do that, you have to know a few things first.

This bootcamp is designed for students who know that they want to go on to doctoral study. Over the course of two sessions, we will prepare you for the Ph.D. application process by helping you to get your research proposals in shape. These personal statements are the keystones of your entire application; we  can’t stress enough how much they matter to your success in gaining entry to the program(s) of your choice.

In session one of the series, we’ll spend some time discussing what you’ll need to do for session two. In sum, you’ll need to come to session one with some idea of the discipline(s) you’re interested in. You’ll also need to have some idea about the schools/cities/programs in which you can envision yourself for the next 5-7 years of your academic life. Then, we’ll discuss strategy for Ph.D. applications and homework for the next session. WARNING: This is a bootcamp. There will be a large amount of research, prep work, and writing for session two.

In the second session, you will be responsible for bringing a draft of a personal statement with a semi-fleshed out research project to class for work-shopping and peer review. In addition, you must bring a list of your top 5 schools/programs and know which professors you might want to work with – or who might want to work with you – at each school. You should be able to explain the differences among the programs (each school typically has its own approach to the disciplines) and how you’ll craft a slightly different personal statement for each unique program.

Please RSVP to draper.program[at]nyu.edu

Pursuing a Ph.D. in History: A Panel Discussion

Friday October 18th, 2013
2pm-3:30pm
King Juan Carlos Center
53 Washington Square South
7th Floor—Room 701

Are you a current BA or MA student interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in History in
your near or distant future? The NYU Department of History presents a panel
discussion hosted by current History Ph.D. students to answer your questions on
what it’s like to be in a History doctoral program. Perspectives from BA-to-Ph.D.
and MA-to-Ph.D. students will be shared. Panelists include:

Timo McGregor—A first year and international student perspective.

Betty Banks—A second year perspective.

Anasa Hicks—A third year perspective.

Kate Mulry—The dissertation writing phase.

Beatrice Wayne—The Graduate History Student Association.

RSVP required to graduate.history@nyu.edu. Refreshments will be served.

RSVP! Ph.D. Workshop and a New Ph.D. Application Bootcamp This Spring

Dear students:

In addition to our semi-annual Ph.D. workshop, which is intended to provide an informational introduction to doctoral degrees and the Ph.D. application process in general, Draper will also be offering a multi-session Ph.D. Application Bootcamp in April. Designed by Professor Theresa MacPhail, this Bootcamp is an in-depth intensive that will guide students in selecting the right Ph.D. programs to apply to, as well as crafting strong, distinctive applications to each.
More information about both the Ph.D. workshop (in March) and April’s Bootcamp are below; please RSVP for both atdraper.program@nyu.edu.
Important: Students who wish to participate in the Ph.D. Application Bootcamp *must* attend the Ph.D. workshop in March.

***
Spring 2012 Ph.D. Application Workshop
Friday, March 23
6:00 – 8:00 PM
Draper Map Room


Led by Professors Mario Caro and Amber Musser

This workshop is a mini-orientation session geared towards students who are either considering a Ph.D. or those who are already in the early stages of the application process. It is also relevant to students who are interested in general information regarding doctoral degrees and those who need some guidance as to what they should be prepared for in terms of the application process. Some general issues that will be tackled are:

* How do I know if a PhD is right for me?
* Setting realistic expectations of the PhD process and future career trajectories.
* Choosing a department as well as a university that is a good fit for me.
*What to expect in terms of the contents and deadlines for a PhD application.
* Using Draper as a resource for making decisions about a PhD and a career in academia.

We encourage all Draper students who are interested in future doctoral studies and have questions regarding the same to attend this workshop.

***

Ph.D. Application Bootcamp

A multi-session workshop led by Theresa MacPhail


*Please note: Students *must* attend the Ph.D. Application Workshop on March 23 in order to take part in this bootcamp series. See the Draper website for more information on the Ph.D. workshop.*


Session One (Optional): Friday, April 6, 2012: 5:00 – 6:00 PM (Draper Map Room)

Students who cannot attend this session should email Prof. MacPhail directly (tmm260@nyu.edu) so that they will be able to prepare for session two.


Session Two: Friday, April 20, 2012: 6:00 – 8:00 PM (Draper Map Room)

___

So you know that you want to get a Ph.D. You’ve attended the Ph.D. workshop at Draper and you’ve decided that academic life is right for you. Now the real fun begins. . .

You need to put together a great application, an application that sings your praises to admissions committees, that entices them into offering you a great admissions package. But, in order to do that, you have to know a few things first.


This bootcamp is designed for students who know that they want to go on to doctoral study. Over the course of two sessions, we will prepare you for the PhD application process by helping you to get your research proposals in shape. These personal statements are the keystones of your entire application; we can’t stress enough how much they matter to your success in gaining entry to the program(s) of your choice.


In session one of the series, we’ll spend some time discussing what you’ll need to do for session two. In sum, you’ll need to come to session one with some idea of the discipline(s) you’re interested in. You’ll also need to have some idea about the schools/cities/programs in which you can envision yourself for the next 5-7 years of your academic life. Then, we’ll discuss strategy for PhD applications and homework for the next session. WARNING: This is a bootcamp. There will be a large amount of research, prep work, and writing for session two.


In the second session, you will be responsible for bringing a draft of a personal statement with a semi-fleshed out research project to class for work-shopping and peer review. In addition, you must bring a list of your top 5 schools/programs and know which professors you might want to work with – or who might want to work with you – at each school. You should be able to explain the differences among the programs (each school typically has its own approach to the disciplines) and how you’ll craft a slightly different personal statement for each unique program.

Workshop Reminders

Ph.D Application Workshop
Friday, October 14
5:30 – 7:30 PM
Draper Map Room

Led by Professors Theresa MacPhail and Amber Musser. Please email Draper (draper.program@nyu.edu) or call the main line (212.998.8070) to RSVP.

MA Thesis Workshop
Friday, November 4
6:00 – 8:00 PM
Draper Map Room

Led by Professors Rebecca Colesworthy and Steven Moga. Please email Draper (draper.program@nyu.edu) or call the main line (212.998.8070) to RSVP.

Student & Alumni News!

It’s been another big year for Draper students and alumni. If you have news to share, please email us at draper.program@nyu.edu and let us know!

Dinika Amaral (May 2011) was accepted to MFA programs at NYU, Queens College, and San Francisco State University. She received a fellowship to attend the program at NYU, where she’ll start in the fall.

John Allen (Alumnus, 2010)
has started teaching as an adjunct professor at the University of the Pacific. He will be teaching two undergraduate seminars this fall.

Brian Ballard (May 2011) was accepted to Philosophy doctoral programs at the University of Pittsburgh, UC Santa Barbara, CUNY, Purdue, the University of Rochester, and the University of Texas, Austin. He’ll be starting at the University of Pittsburgh this fall.

Sarah Broderick (May 2011)
was accepted to MFA programs in Creative Writing (fiction) at San Francisco State University, the University of San Francisco, and St. Mary’s College (where she was also awarded a fiction scholarship). She will begin at San Francisco State in the fall.

Sarah also presented her thesis, under the condensed title “Puncturing the Skin of a Nation: The (Re)presentation of the Black Vampire in Popular Film,” at Brooklyn College’s Graduate English Conference in April 2011.

David Colosi
(Alumnus, 2006) presented his narrative installation “The Superintendent’s Keys” in Steinhardt’s ‘Broadway Windows’ during March 2011. The piece depicted “six narrative vignettes in comic strip-like format” and also included a live performance on opening night.

Halah Darwazeh (May 2011) was accepted to the doctoral program for Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine.

Richard Evans (Alumnus, 2008)
is in his second year at the Institute for the Comparative Study of Literature, Arts and Culture at Carleton University in Canada.

Ay
let Even-Nur (May 2011) was accepted to the doctoral program in Near Eastern Studies at Berkeley.

Russell Fehr (Alumnus, 2009)
will complete his MA in History (in progress to his Ph.D) at the University of California, Riverside in June 2011. He anticipates advancing to Ph.D. candidacy in the spring of 2012.

Ann Halbert-Brooks
was accepted to the History doctoral program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she will focus on Latin American history.

Eric Hodges (May 2011)
was accepted to the East Asian Studies doctoral program at NYU.

Scott Kaplan
started a media and communications internship at the Austrian Cultural Forum.

Elizabeth Kinsley was accepted to the doctoral program in Rhetoric and Public Culture at Northwestern.

Dani Limos (Alumna, 2010) has been accepted to the London School of Economics where she will begin a MSc in Social Policy and International Development this fall. She plans to focus on microloans in developing countries of Latin America and Africa. Over the summer, Dani will be working at Legacy International with an Indonesian youth exchange, and also complete an internship with the Grameen Foundation.

Mirelle Luecke (Alumna, 2011) was accepted to the the doctoral program in History at the University of Pittsburgh.

Luce Melendez-Robledo (May 2011) will be attending law school at the University of Puerto Rico this fall.

Ji Hyuck Moon (May 2011) will publish his first collection of short stories in Korea this summer.

April Pierce (May 2011)
was accepted to D.Phil programs in English literature at Oxford and University College London. She will start at Oxford in the fall.

Shabnam Piryaei
‘s poetry collection Ode to Fragile was published by Plain View Press in October 2010. She also wrote and directed three short films based on poetry from the book, which all screened in the U.S. at the Woodstock Film Festival, the Indie Spirit Film Festival, the Red Rock Film Festival, the Miami Short Film Festival and the Target Art Gallery, and internationally at the Portobello Film Festival, Canterbury Short Film Festival, and the Zebra Poetry Film Festival.

Alexander Ponomareff (May 2011)
was accepted to the Comparative Literature doctoral program at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Megan Schmidt has been interning at the International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect since September 2010. She has been using her work at the Coalition to develop a course paper which comparatively examines the crises in Cote d’Ivoire and Libya, international responses, and what this means for the implementation of the Responsibility to Protect.

Megan also published her paper “Chinese and Indian Economic Practices with Africa: Fueling Growth or Undermining Development?” (which she wrote for Topics in Global Histories with Maia Ramnath in fall 2010) in the spring issue of NYU’s human rights journal, Humanus.