Tag Archives: Research

Spring Welcome Week, Library workshops for graduate students

Brush up your library research skills with a workshop.
Sessions focus on learning how to organize your bibliographies, finding out to how to track down tricky citations, understanding the intricacies of analyzing data, and even just knowing your way around an American research library.

Full calendar of NYU Library events is available here.

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Improve Your Research Skills! Sign up for an NYU Libraries Class Today

Need help managing and organizing your research sources? Using and analyzing data sets? Integrating metadata into a digital humanities project?
Bobst Library has several upcoming  classes that cover citation management tools (like RefWorks, EndNote, and Zotero), data sets and software, and digital humanities topics.

Bobst Library class schedule and sign-up:
http://nyu.libcal.com/

Wrangling Your References: Research Management in the Real World

April 8, 3:00 – 4:30PM at the Grad Exchange (Bobst 10th Floor)

  • Do you want to spend the least amount of time possible on compiling and formatting the bibliography for your thesis or dissertation?
  • Do you seemingly have over a thousand article PDFs, all with unhelpful names like “gfc.211005.5.1.56,” saved in a hundred different folders across multiple computers?
  • Have you ever panicked at the thought of citing a tweet in APA style?
  • Do you want to learn more about different tools and workflows for managing and organizing your research?

If so, join NYU Libraries for  “Wrangling Your References: Research Management in the Real World,” a panel discussion about different options for research and citation management, to be held on April 8, 2015, 3-4:30pm, in the Grad Exchange (Bobst Library, 10th Floor).

Three researchers from different fields will be revealing their personal secrets to making the research/writing process easier and more effective. Librarians will also be on hand to answer all your questions about personal research management tools like EndNote, Mendeley, RefWorks/FLOW, and Zotero, including which one is right for you.

Light refreshments will be served! RSVP at http://nyu.libcal.com/event.php?id=936477

Fall 2014 Graduate Student Library Workshop Series

Hello from the NYU Libraries:
As the fall semester kicks off, we’re offering our annual series of Graduate Student workshops where you can learn everything from how to organize your bibliographies, to how to track down those tricky citations, to how to be a more effective research assistant (and much more). For the complete listing of these sessions, and to sign up, go to:

–> http://library.nyu.edu/grads

You can also get the new school year started right by joining us at our Annual Graduate Student Reception. It is a great opportunity to meet your subject librarian, as well as mingle with your fellow graduate students over some complimentary food and drinks. We will be giving away NYU Bookstore gift certificates to some lucky attendees. The reception will take place:

–> Thursday, September 11th, 5:30-7:00, 8th-floor North Reading Room, Bobst library

Please RSVP by going to http://library.nyu.edu/grads

We have been working hard over the past few years to expand and improve our services and spaces to fit your needs, and we hope you’ll help us keep improving.

We look forward to meeting you and wish you the best of luck this semester!

— The NYU Libraries Graduate Student Working Group

 

Fall 2014 African American History Seminar

Professor Jeffrey T. Sammons has opened his African American History Seminar to Draper students!

Details:
Tuesdays, 4:55 – 7:40
KJCC 607
Jeffrey Sammons: ks11[at]nyu.edu

Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to afford participants the opportunity to produce an original research paper on any aspect, in any period, of the history of African Americans broadly construed. The course is designed so as to introduce new material and new ways of looking at familiar material for more senior students and to provide foundational support to those with no or limited graduate level exposure to African American History and/or training in historical research methods and theory as related to the subject material. Much of both sets of supports will be found through classic and cutting-edge scholarly products rather than through explicitly instructional sources. The objective is to help you ask the right kinds of questions of the material, as any subject is only as important as the questions asked of it. The finished product, of twenty-five to thirty pages, will satisfy the seminar requirement for the Masters degree if the grade is B or higher.

During the first five weeks of the course we will discuss common readings. All participants will be expected to read all assigned materials and contribute meaningfully to class discussions. During that period, those students without a project in mind should be seriously exploring and developing a topic. I expect that during these early weeks that all of you will consult with me on the basis of need. Those who have a firm topic should inform me immediately for an assessment of viability and acceptability.