Tag Archives: Steinhardt

Nov 14 | Illness Narratives, Networked Subjects, and Intimate Publics | hosted by MCC and the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing

Illness Narratives, Networked Subjects, and Intimate Publics
/// Friday, November 14, 2014, New York University, 1-5 PM
REGISTER
Through the relational production and circulation of personal narratives about experiences with pain and loss, new publics are created while networked subjects are negotiated. This colloquium addresses the productive capacities of illness, disability, death, and dying, asking how individuals use online platforms or other forms of new technology to both reproduce and contest popular discourses surrounding these everyday phenomena.
Copyright © 2014 NYU Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, All rights reserved.
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Friday, April 18 | Anarchism, Engagement & Theories of Mediation

The NYU Department of Media, Culture, and Communication Lecture Series presents


Anarchism, Engagement & Theories of Mediation: Approaches and Questions
Friday, April 18 | 6:00-8:30
239 Greene Street, Floor 8
 
 

What might be spurred by bridging media theory and anarchist thought and practices? How might these two bodies of thought animate each other in potentially generative ways? How has anarchist thought influenced various media forms? We believe that the conversation generated by these questions will present us with a unique opportunity to reflect upon the politics of organizing, the shape of contemporary critical theory, and various alternative media practices. To give form to this discussion, the event brings together several individuals whose work can speak to these issues in different capacities.

 

6:00-6:15 pm INTRODUCTION 

6:15-7:15 pm ROUNDTABLE (lightning talks // 5-7 minutes each) 

Alexis Bhagat: The Words That We Use

Todd May: Anarchism and Academic Thought

Cindy Milstein: Anarchism as Media and Mediation 

Nick Mirzoeff: Are We All Anarchists Now?

Shiri Pasternak: Anarchy and Settler Colonialism: Being Against the State Means Being For Indigenous Sovereignty

Richard Porton: Defining Anarchist Cinema: An Impossible Task

 Laura Portwood-Stacer: Lifestyle as Medium: Performances of Everyday Life and Anarchist Praxis

7:30-8:30 pm OPEN FORUM for discussion and debate with public 

Wine reception to follow

 
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MCC Graduate Courses | Summer 2014

Please see below for information on two graduate courses being offered by Steinhardt’s Media, Culture, and Communication department this summer that may be of interest to ​Draper​ students.
 
If interested, please first email Robert Dimit for important registration info.
 
​——————-
 
MCC-GE 2149-001 Cultural History of TV
Susan Murray
Summer Session I, May 27 – June 14, 2014
Mon, Tues, Wed & Thurs 12:00 – 2:45 PM | 4 credits

MA Area of Study: Visual Culture and Cultural Studies
This course will survey the cultural and industrial history of American television. Students will come to understand how technological innovation, regulatory bodies, advertisers, network heads, creative producers, and audiences have interacted with economic, social, and political forces to shape television over time. We will also discuss the methodological practices and concerns involved in the writing of media histories, specifically the history of broadcasting.
 
Please contact the instructor, Susan Murray (susan.murray@nyu.edu), with any questions.
 
Susan Murray is an associate professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. She is the author of Hitch Your Antenna to the Stars! Early Television and Broadcast Stardom (2005) and the co-editor, with Laurie Ouellette, of two editions of Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture (2004; 2009). She is currently writing a history of color television in the U.S., which is under contract with Duke University.
 
MCC-GE 2166-001 The Global City and Media Ethnography
Allen Feldman
Summer Session I, May 27 – June 14, 2014
Mon, Tues, Wed & Thurs 4:55 – 7:40 PM | 4 credits
MA Areas of Study: Global and Transcultural Communication; Visual Culture and Cultural Studies
Global urbanism harbors multiple actualities, designed and imagined space, performative inscription and collective memory, embodied sensation and digital simulacra. This seminar engages participant-sensation, observant participation and the affective fabric of techno-mediatic forms of life. Our terrain is sensory-centered research through visual, sonic and haptic cultures and media archeologies. The research process will focus on the sensory envelope of the self and the interface of a media skin shaped by technics and culture. The curriculum is aimed at students in the humanities, the arts and social sciences seeking practice-led skills at the intersection of social aesthetics and evidence-based multi-media inquiry. Our practice-led pedagogy empowers self-reflexive contextual and critical understandings of mediatic and sensory subjectivity in the creative process of research, in post-research curation-exhibition, dissemination and archival performances. 

Please contact the course instructor, Allen Feldman (af31@nyu.edu), with any questions.  

Allen Feldman has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the emergency zones of Northern Ireland and South Africa and among the homeless infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in New York City. He teaches visual culture, performance studies, and philosophy of media. Through numerous publications he pioneered the political ethnography of embodiment and the senses. He has designed and team-taught practice-led seminar-clinics with documentary film-makers, photographers, installation and digital artists in Budapest, Paris, Ljubljana and Dublin, and has written exhibition catalogue essays on immersion, web, and installation art for shows and on-line exhibitions in New York City and Lisbon.

Summer courses @ Draper

Hello all, 
 
We now have our (limited) summer course offerings up on our website, with a link on our homepage. 
 
 
Please refer to this page, rather than Albert, for the most accurate course listings.
 
There are no access codes required to register for summer classes and Draper does not hold formal advising for the summer semester. Please email Robert directly to let him know about your course plans if you intend to take summer classes.
 
Also, see below for a summer course in Steinhardt that may be of interest to Draper students: 
 
 

 

 

The Global City and Media Ethnography

MCC GE 2166-001 (2922)

Mo/Tu/We/Th 4:55 pm – 7:40 pm

 May 27, 2014  Jun 14, 2014

 Professor Allen Feldman  

af31@nyu.edu

Global urbanism harbors and mobilizes  multiple actualities, designed and imagined space, performative inscription and collective memory, embodied sensation and digital simulacra. This seminar engages participant-sensation, observant participation and the affective fabric of techno-mediatic forms of life. Our terrain of inquiry is sensory-centered research through visual, sonic and haptic culture and media archeologies. The research process will focus on the sensory envelope of the self and the interface of a media skin shaped by technics and symbolic practice. The curriculum is aimed at M.A. and PhD students in the humanities, the arts and social sciences seeking practice-led skills at the intersection of aesthetics and evidence-based multi-media inquiry. Our practice-led pedagogy empowers self-reflexive, contextual and critical understandings of mediatic and sensory subjectivity in the creative process of research, in post-research curation-exhibition, dissemination and archival performance.

Bio: Allen Feldman  has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in the emergency zones of Northern Ireland and South Africa and among the homeless infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in New York City.  He teaches visual culture, performance studies and philosophy of media at NYU. Through numerous publications he pioneered the political ethnography of embodiment and the senses. He has designed and team-taught practice-led seminar-clinics with documentary film-makers, photographers, installation and digital artists in Budapest, Paris, Ljubljana and Dublin, and has written exhibition catalogue essays on immersion, web and installation art for shows and on-line exhibitions in New York City and Lisbon.

Lecture on Extra-Terrestrial Space Garbage, 4/10

A central tenet of accelerationist aesthetics is that mediaworks that deliver and bear witness to the “intensity effect” of everyday life “help and train us to endure – and perhaps also to negotiate – the ‘unthinkable complexity’ of cyberspace,” and also the unrepresentable immensity and intensity of ‘the world space of multinational capital’ (Shaviro quoting Gibson and Jameson, respectively). The present paper turns for deeper inquiry to commercial ad spots featuring foreign objects falling Earthwards from the sky – “space junk” centrally, and also things like destructive alien robots – arguing that their scenarios draw unduly charged attention to foreign threats to domestic security, all the while displacing the greater threat of multinational technologies of militarism: sources of social senses and narratives of insecurity in the accelerated networks of global capitalist practice. In short, they are artifacts of false witness. To the extent that visual ethnography productively engages with, rather than despairing of perspectival instability, and attenuates encounters with alien modalities of relating, it holds out the possibility of a countervailing force to the implicit resignation of accelerationist aesthetic regimes.