Tag Archives: Visual Culture

Call for Papers: InVisible Culture – Security and Visibility

“Security and Visibility” – Issue 25

For its twenty-­‐fifth issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that explore the concept of security and visual culture.

For almost two decades, both scholarly and public interests in matters of national security and the corresponding surveillance of public space have increased immensely. Notions of visibility figure prominently in these discussions. The  expanding  academic  fields  of  Security  and  Surveillance  Studies have successfully engaged with the multiple layers connecting (national) security, surveillance, and the visual. Focusing on present-­‐day phenomena, sociologists, political scientists, and culture and media scholars have already developed an integrative perspective when it comes to relating issues surrounding security to the field of visibility. Consequently, newer research on security has focused on decentralized practices of security, encompassing much more than just “official” government agencies and their mediaries.

For this issue, we seek to engage a historical perspective on issues of security and visibility through a close reading of texts in contemporary social sciences and cultural studies. With a special insert edited by scholars Barbara Lüthi and Olaf Stieglitz at the University of Cologne, this issue will focus on visual material as  a  source  of meaning  and  power, this  issue  will function  as  a  broad investigation  of both stable and changing notions of security over time and place. By bearing social and political dimensions of visibility in mind, a turn to images may prove helpful in asking how their performative power invokes securitization processes through immediacy (Moeller 2009; Mirzoeff 2011).

We welcome papers and artworks that further the various understandings of securitization through a consideration of the visual. Possible topics of exploration include, but are not limited to:

  • methodological debates on using visual material
  • the ethics of surveillance, big data, and the right to privacy
  • history of national securities and surveillance
  • counter-­‐visibilities, hacking, and the critique of security
Please send completed papers (with references following the guidelines from the Chicago Manual of Style) of between 4,000 and 10,000 words to ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com by September 20th, 2015. Inquiries should be sent to the same address.

Creative/Artistic  Works

In addition to written materials, InVisible Culture is accepting work in other media (video, photography, drawing, code) that reflect upon the theme as it is outlined above. For questions or more details concerning acceptable formats, go to http://ivc.lib.rochester.edu/contribute or contact ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com.

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Call for Scholarly Articles: InVisible Culture, an Electronic Journal for Visual Culture

For its twenty-third issue, InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture invites scholarly articles and creative works that consider the multiple valences of the topic: blueprints.

In his theoretical manifesto, Toward An Architecture, Le Corbusier wrote, “The plan is the generator. Without plan there can be neither grandeur of aim and expression, nor rhythm, nor mass, nor coherence. . . . The plan is what determines everything; it is the decisive moment.” The plan or blueprint is the primary tool of the architect’s and the drafter’s trades—a technical document that bridges creative impulse and constructive labor, intent and execution, virtuality and materiality. Taking shape as a conversation among concept, form, and representation, a blueprint insistently nudges its spectator’s gaze outside its frame. It is understood as a necessary stage on the way to something larger, something grander, something more, and is usually seen not as a self-contained object, but as prescription directed toward a particular outcome. Yet a blueprint may also be the terminus of the unrealized and the unrealizable. Étienne-Louis Boullée’s Cénotaphe à Newton, Le Corbusier’s Ville Contemporaine, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacres, and the Chicago Spire are among the many visionary designs abandoned at the drawing board, whose construction in real space we may now only imagine.

In Issue 23, we would like contributors to consider how blueprints—and more broadly, agendas, manifestos, models, or prophesies—negotiate between the present and an imagined, idealized, or impossible future. What qualities and limitations are shared by conceptual architecture and other speculative mediums? How do plans and prototypes function as a critique of present realities? What is the aesthetic value of diagrams, renderings, sketches, or preparatory studies? What occurs when we no longer consider the model as process, but as finished product? What are the mechanisms through which the plan attempts to fill the gap between language and image or event?

We welcome papers and artworks that further the various understandings of blueprints. Possible topics of exploration include, but are not limited to:

Conceptual architecture
Models, prototypes, renderings, and preparatory studies
Graphs, cyanotypes, etchings, and other media related to tracing
Political manifestos
Prophecy and speculation
Disparity between concept and execution
Representations of utopia or dystopia
World’s Fairs and Expos
Storyboards and scripts
Unfinished or posthumously completed works
Dance and performance notation
Digital urban planning
Please send completed papers (with references following the guidelines from the Chicago Manual of Style) of between 4,000 and 10,000 words to ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com by October 15, 2014. Inquiries should be sent to the same address.

Creative/Artistic Works
In addition to written materials, InVisible Culture is accepting work in other media (video, photography, drawing, code) that reflect upon the theme as it is outlined above. For questions or more details concerning acceptable formats, go tohttp://ivc.lib.rochester.edu/contribute or contact ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com.

Reviews
InVisible Culture is also currently seeking submissions for book, exhibition, and film reviews (600-1,000 words). To submit a review proposal, go tohttp://ivc.lib.rochester.edu/contribute or contact ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com.

Blog
The journal also invites submissions to its blog feature, which will accommodate more immediate responses to the topic of the current issue. For further details, please contact us at ivc[dot]rochester[at]gmail[dot]com with the subject heading “blog submission.”

* InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture (IVC) is a student run interdisciplinary journal published online twice a year in an open access format. Through peer reviewed articles, creative works, and reviews of books, films, and exhibitions, our issues explore changing themes in visual culture. Fostering a global and current dialog across fields, IVC investigates the power and limits of vision.

InVisible Culture
503A Morey Hall
University of Rochester
Rochester, NY 14627

http://ivc.lib.rochester.edu

CFP: The Crisis of the Book: Worlds of Opportunity, Worlds of Change (Reed College, Due 6/1)

The Crisis of the Book: 
Worlds of Opportunity, Worlds of Change

October 18–20, 2012
Portland, Oregon
Hosted by the Reed College 
Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program

call for papers/presentations
2012 annual conference
In the current electronic age, a few keystrokes will deliver vast amounts of information instantly and allow us to communicate with a wide audience indiscriminately. In this changing landscape, what is the role of the printed book as transmitter of knowledge and as material object? Revolutions in technology throughout history have changed the way we receive and process information, even the way we think about ideas. From scroll to codex, printing press to computer screen, just as familiar modes of communication disappear, new possibilities and opportunities take their place. This interdisciplinary conference will place the transformation in print culture in a historical framework, and will reflect upon the changing nature of text delivery and the experience of reading. 
How is knowledge produced? What role does the text play as cultural, material, and sacred object? How do we “read” historically, culturally, popularly, and what is the future of the practice of reading? What is the place of the modern library in the electronic age? How does the new field of media studies reflect evolving social contexts?  How do we “see” graphic novels or navigate through hypertext fiction? What questions concerning copyright and intellectual property does the digital age raise? 
The 2012 AGLSP Annual Conference invites papers addressing how knowledge and ideas are produced and disseminated. In this context, we welcome a broader definition of “text” to include electronic, film, pictorial, etc. Special consideration will be given to submissions which address the integration of this theme into Liberal Studies curricula and classes.
Paper presentation should be 20 minutes long with an additional 5 to 10 minutes for questions. Please submit a one to two page abstract electronically to Barbara Amen (bamen@reed.edu), MALS director at Reed College, by June 1. (Be sure to write “AGLSP Submission” in the subject line.) Also, please include multi-media requirements, although we encourage presenters to give judicious consideration to the effective use of PowerPoint. Additional conference information at aglsp.org

Call for Applications: Forum on Forms of Seeing

Please see below for a call for applications to the Forum on Forms of Seeing, cosponsored by GSAS and the Institute of Fine Arts. Draper student Christine Olson participated in the forum this year and has offered to speak to any other Draperites who are interested in applying for next year’s forum. If you would like to be in touch with Christine, please email Draper directly at draper.program@nyu.edu. 

This year’s Forum on Forms of Seeing Symposium (including a presentation by Christine) will be held on April 27. More information about the symposium is available here

New York University
Forum on Forms of Seeing

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS & APPLICATIONS
Spring 2012

FORUM DESCRIPTIONThe Graduate School of Arts and Science and the Institute of Fine Arts are pleased to invite nominations and applications for a specialized interdisciplinary forum for graduate students whose work addresses modes of visual representation and their products. Focused on the ways in which cultures give form to visual experience, the Forum on Forms of Seeing aims to bring together students from a wide range of graduate programs. Applications are encouraged from students who have strong historical and/or theoretical interests in images and visuality in the broadest sense, and who wish to become closely familiar with other disciplines concerned with visual representation.

Over the past few decades, many disciplines have become interested in “visuality” as a wider natural and cultural phenomenon that includes not only the traditional fine arts but imaging practices of all kinds, from cinema and popular print culture to digital reality techniques and scientific modeling. Anthropology, Philosophy, History, Literary Criticism, Psychoanalysis, and Neuroscience have taken significant interest in the concept of the visual, and relatively young disciplines such as Cinema Studies and Visual Studies or Visual Culture put visual representation at the center of their research. Art History itself has become more cognizant of the limitations of traditional medium-bound definitions of the image, and has taken up a more fluidly-defined visuality as one of its central problems. Reflecting the dramatic expansion of visuality as a category for scholarly inquiry, the Forum invites applications for membership from any NYU graduate program.

How images in different periods and cultures imitate, model, render, or critique the world and our visual apprehension of it, for their makers and for their viewers, will be of central interest to the Forum. This historical and comparative approach may profitably be complemented by a philosophical understanding of the image as record of, or model for, acts of seeing. The creation, dissemination, function, signification, efficacy, duration, destruction, and demise of images will be welcome topics for the Forum.

MEETING FORMATMembership in the Forum on Forms of Seeing will be for one academic year, commencing in September 2012 and ending in April 2013. All eight members will present and critique work in progress during monthly, moderated lunch sessions, scheduled on Fridays, from 12–3 p.m., at Washington Square and the Institute of Fine Arts. The meetings will culminate in a one-day event at the end of the semester, showcasing the year’s presentations. Members are expected to attend every session and to participate in the end-of-year symposium. A stipend of $500 is distributed per semester.

APPLICATION PROCEDURETo apply for membership in the 2012-13 Forum on Forms of Seeing, please provide a one-page statement of your scholarly interest in visual representation and the relevance of interdisciplinary debate about visuality for your graduate work.  Your application should include a current transcript (unofficial is fine), CV, and a recommendation by a NYU faculty member. Please submit your completed application electronically by end-of-day Monday, May 7 to Anna Antoniak (anna.antoniak@nyu.edu).

For more information, please visit the Forum on Forms of Seeing blog at blogs.nyu.edu/blogs/bms247/forumonformsofseeing/

Applicants are encouraged to attend this year’s symposium on Friday, April 27 (4-7 PM) at 7 East 12th Street, Rm 321.


IFA-GSAS Forum on Forms of Seeing Annual Symposium: 4/27

Draper’s Christine Olson will be presenting at this symposium.

IFA-GSAS Forum on Forms of Seeing Annual Symposium
Friday, April 27, 2012 // 7 East 12 Street, Rm 321 // 4-7 PM

The Forum on Forms of Seeing is a specialized interdisciplinary forum for graduate students whose work addresses modes of visual representation and their products. Join us on Friday, April 27th for a series of brief presentations. Reception to follow for the (re)launch of the Forum’s online presence.
Scheduled Presentations
Reception to Follow
DENA A. AL‐ADEEB [Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, GSAS]
Transnational and Transdisciplinary Turns In Contemporary West‐Asian & North African Art
BLANCA DE LA VÁLGOMA [Institute of Fine Arts, GSAS]
Seeing a Portrait as They Saw It: Towards a Visual Culture of Seventeenth‐Century Spain
LEE ELIZABETH DOUGLAS [Anthropology, GSAS]

Photographing Forensics: Art, Science & the Politics of Visual Evidence in Post‐Dictatorship Argentina & Spain

SARAH GRISWOLD [Institute of French Studies/History, GSAS] 
Protecting the Muses: The League of Nations and Cultural Heritage Policy
CHRISTINE OLSON [Humanities and Social Thought, GSAS] 
Inscribing Turkishness: Alphabet and National Identity
ALIZA SHVARTS [Performance Studies, Tisch] 
Fake Blood and Queer Belonging
APRIL STRICKLAND [Anthropology, GSAS] 
Maori Media in the 21st Century
RACHAEL WILSON [English, GSAS] 
Clark Coolidge’s Dialogic Poetry: Polaroid and Smithsonian Depositions
MAYA WINFREY [Performance Studies, Tisch] 
Racial Signification in Young Jean Lee’s LEAR: A Surface Reading

For more information about last year’s event, please visit
blogs.nyu.edu/blogs/bms247/forumonformsofseeing/