Tag Archives: Workshops

Spring Welcome Week, Library workshops for graduate students

Brush up your library research skills with a workshop.
Sessions focus on learning how to organize your bibliographies, finding out to how to track down tricky citations, understanding the intricacies of analyzing data, and even just knowing your way around an American research library.

Full calendar of NYU Library events is available here.

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Reminder: Thesis Workshop Tonight! 7:00 – 9:00 pm

Will you begin writing your thesis sometime in the next few semesters? Wondering where to start and how to get organized? Curious about honing a topic and finding an advisor? The thesis writing workshop will answer these and other pressing questions. Emma Heaney and Patrick Vitale will help you learn how to approach the project with less stress and more focus (even if you won’t be writing your thesis for a while). This workshop will also be offered again in the spring.

Call 212.998.8070 or email draper.program[at]nyu.edu to let us know if you’ll be attending.

11/11: Five Workshops on Hurricane Sandy & Making Change + Panel: A Tale of Two Sandys

 

Superstorm Research Lab: One Year On | Workshops and Panel

 

Monday Nov 11, 2013
20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor

New York, NY 10003

4:00-5:00pm: Public Workshops- Sign up for Workshops
5:30-7:00pm: Panel: A Tale of Two Sandys- RSVP for Event 

Establishing community cooperatives post-Sandy; with L.A. Murphy & Nathan Kleinman, Occupy Sandy NJ . Rm 485, 4th floor, 20 Cooper Square.
Best practices of grassroots disaster data collection; with Max Liboiron, Superstorm Research Lab. Conference Room A, 4th floor, 20 Cooper Square.
Renters Advocacy, post-Sandy; with Melissa McCrumb, Make the Road NY. Rm 485, 20 Cooper Square.
Mobility Choices; with Noah Budnick, Transportation Alternatives. Conference Room B, 4th floor, 20 Cooper Square.
Insurance, Risk, & Financialization Post-Sandy; with Michael Ralph, Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University. Rm 502, 5th floor, 20 Cooper Square.

Sign up for workshops here.

 

More than a year after Hurricane Sandy hit New York City and surrounding area, one of the conundrums of disaster aid and recovery remains: how do we ensure that plans for recovery match the different needs of diverse populations and ensure higher resilience for future disasters? Join Superstorm Research Lab, a mutual aid research collective, and our allies in free, open workshops designed to address past, current, and future problems related to disaster and the complexities of justice on the ground. Workshops will be followed by a panel discussion, “A Tale of Two Sandys,” that highlights current research in this area. 

 

Don’t Forget to Register for Draper’s Summer Writing Workshops

Dear students:

Please find a reminder below about Draper’s upcoming Summer Writing Workshops, offered in summer sessions one and two with Profs. Theresa MacPhail and Steven Moga. 
If you plan on enrolling, please do so within the next week–courses with low initial enrollments are often cancelled over the summer. 

You do not need an access code to register for the writing workshop; the class numbers you need to enroll are below. 
Please contact draper.program@nyu.edu with questions. 

***


Every summer, Draper offers a workshop course called “Preparation for Graduate School: Summer Writing Workshop.” Although this course was originally designed for incoming graduate students, it has also been very useful to some Draper students after completing their first semesters in the program. 


If you’d like to brush up your writing skills this summer, the course will be offered in both summer session one (with Prof. MacPhail) andsummer session two (with Prof. Moga). It’s a pass/fail class which can be taken for two credits, or as a non-credit course (there’s a flat fee of $1,000 for the non-credit section; regular tuition applies to the two credit sections). There are no access codes for Draper’s summercourses, so you can just enroll directly on Albert. 
Course descriptions for both Prof. MacPhail and Prof. Moga’s workshops are below. Email Draper (draper.program@nyu.edu) with any questions about the course or summer registration. 
***
Summer Session One: 5/21 – 6/29

Summer Writing Workshop
Prof. Theresa MacPhail

Mondays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Draper Map Room

DRAP-GA.2900
Section 001: non-credit (CLASS NUMBER: 1487)
Section 002: two credits (CLASS NUMBER: 1488)

This course introduces incoming and first-year graduate students to the practice of academic writing. We’ll cover some of the specific forms and styles that graduate students routinely encounter, including: grant proposals and prospectuses, abstracts, book  and literature reviews, critical essays, and research papers. We’ll also seek to demystify the writing process by discussing some of the practical problems that writers face and breaking down the process into manageable tasks at each stage.
           
Because this course is a practical, hands-on workshop, it will be centered around what you write from week to week, as well as in-classwriting activities including peer review, feedback, editing, and discussion. Readings will consist of short articles on particular aspects ofwriting, and examples of the genres we are working with.
Aside from the writing you produce during the course, you should also have a longer paper that you would like to revise, either something in progress or previously written for another course. It doesn’t have to be a fully polished piece but it should have a recognizable shape with introduction, body and conclusion fleshed out. In case you do not have a suitable paper available, we can make other arrangements.
Summer Session Two: 7/2 – 8/10

Summer Writing Workshop
Prof. Steven Moga

Tuesdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Draper Map Room

DRAP-GA.2900
Section 003: non-credit (CLASS NUMBER 1489)
Section 004: two credits (CLASS NUMBER 1490)

This course focuses on academic writing in the form of short essays and research papers. Designed as a workshop, it aims to teach students practical skills for success in graduate school through weekly writing assignments, in-class writing and editing exercises, readings about academic writing, and discussion. Topics include style and tone in academic argument, writing with clarity and sophistication, the use of jargon and technical language, time management and the term paper, and the writing process.

Check Out Draper’s Summer Writing Workshops

Every summer, Draper offers a workshop course called “Preparation for Graduate School: Summer Writing Workshop.” Although this course was originally designed for incoming graduate students, it has also been very useful to some Draper students after completing their first semesters in the program. 
If you’d like to brush up your writing skills this summer, the course will be offered in both summer session one (with Prof. MacPhail) and summer session two (with Prof. Moga). It’s a pass/fail class which can be taken for two credits, or as a non-credit course (there’s a flat fee of $1,000 for the non-credit section; regular tuition applies to the two credit sections). There are no access codes for Draper’s summer courses, so you can just enroll directly on Albert. 
Course descriptions for both Prof. MacPhail and Prof. Moga’s workshops are below. Email Draper (draper.program@nyu.edu) with any questions about the course or summer registration. 
***
Summer Session One: 5/21 – 6/29

Summer Writing Workshop
Prof. Theresa MacPhail

Mondays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Draper Map Room

DRAP-GA.2900
Section 001: non-credit 
Section 002: two credits

This course introduces incoming and first-year graduate students to the practice of academic writing. We’ll cover some of the specific forms and styles that graduate students routinely encounter, including: grant proposals and prospectuses, abstracts, book  and literature reviews, critical essays, and research papers. We’ll also seek to demystify the writing process by discussing some of the practical problems that writers face and breaking down the process into manageable tasks at each stage.
           
Because this course is a practical, hands-on workshop, it will be centered around what you write from week to week, as well as in-class writing activities including peer review, feedback, editing, and discussion. Readings will consist of short articles on particular aspects of writing, and examples of the genres we are working with.
Aside from the writing you produce during the course, you should also have a longer paper that you would like to revise, either something in progress or previously written for another course. It doesn’t have to be a fully polished piece but it should have a recognizable shape with introduction, body and conclusion fleshed out. In case you do not have a suitable paper available, we can make other arrangements.
Summer Session Two: 7/2 – 8/10

Summer Writing Workshop
Prof. Steven Moga

Tuesdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM
Draper Map Room

DRAP-GA.2900
Section 003: non-credit 
Section 004: two credits

This course focuses on academic writing in the form of short essays and research papers. Designed as a workshop, it aims to teach students practical skills for success in graduate school through weekly writing assignments, in-class writing and editing exercises, readings about academic writing, and discussion. Topics include style and tone in academic argument, writing with clarity and sophistication, the use of jargon and technical language, time management and the term paper, and the writing process.