Tag Archives: Workshops

Notes from Draper’s Recent MA Thesis Workshop

Draper student, Chris Iverson, took some detailed notes at Draper’s recent MA Thesis Workshop that he was kind enough to share. We hope they will be helpful to many of you.

You’ll see that both Steve and Theresa, who led the workshop, mention that Draper has a collection of award-winning and -nominated theses. It’s true! We do! If you haven’t heard of or seen it yet, please feel free to come take a look. The theses are housed in rm 107 and are available to browse during office hours (M-F, 9-5). You can read them at Draper or check a couple out for a week or so. As Steve and Theresa point out, this can be a great resource when it comes to writing/formulating your own thesis.

If anyone has additional notes from this workshop that they’d be willing to share, we’d love to post them to the listserv in addition to Chris’s excellent overview, below.

Please email notes to draper.program@nyu.edu.

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Draper Thesis Workshop 2/24/12

·Draper has a collection of award-winning and -nominated theses to read.

oThis might help with format.

·A thesis topic should relate to where you’ve been and/or where you are going.

oDraw on previous research or design the thesis to help in future work.

·Three starting points might help when considering a topic:

oMethod/methodology

oData/types of sources

oTheory

Steve Moga’s Talking Points

·Pick something that motivates you.

oIf your topic does not interest you, this will be painful.

·Write all the way through.

oDo not collect data and wait to write. You may forget some context or lose steam.

·Be in communication with your advisor.

·Think about the thesis in the simplest possible way (elevator speech). It helps to think about a title to keep on track.

·In the planning stages, it helps to set a deadline and work backwards. This is a way to get an vision of what the finished thesis should look like and break it up into more doable parts.

Theresa MacPhail’s Talking Points

·Writing is thinking.

oFreewriting is a valuable parctice when “stuck.”

oIdea mapping gives the material a physical dimension.

·Reverse outlining can help organize

oTaking a written passage and notating the margins can help find the stucture hidden in a written text. This allows for organizing at a basic level .

·Do not start at the beginning!

oThe thesis or topic may not become clear until the bulk of the paper is written and organized.

·Look at other papers and “steal” the format.

oLike, for example, see Draper’s collection of award-winning and -nominated theses.

·Have a friend or other educated reader take a look at the text to make sure that it does what you want it to do. If another intelligent reader cannot follow the logic, then it may not be organized properly.

·Write a one-sentence thesis statement to help simplify the idea that will make the core of the argument.

·Don’t be afraid to “kill your babies.” In other words, you may have to delete blocks of great text if they prove tangential and do not return to your topic.

oA way to make this less painful is to cut and paste “outtakes” into another file so thay are not lost forever. They may even prove helpful for a future project.

Two Research Workshops for NYU Grad Students

1. Spring Research Breakfast

Come have breakfast, talk with our librarians about your project, and take care of those lingering research to-do list items. This informal event lasts for two hours, and you can come and go as you like during that time.

Thursday, March 8, 10:00am-12:00noon
Bobst Library
10th-floor Graduate Research Exchange (northwest corner)

2. Spring “Clean Up” Workshops for Grad Students
The NYU Libraries are holding a series of workshops and clinics especially for graduate students, led by expert librarians. These sessions focus on core research skills like:

* Identifying key resources in your discipline
* Organizing your research using an easy personal database called RefWorks
* Finding and ordering research materials from other institutions
* …And much more

Workshops will be held March 14-21. Find all the details and sign up at http://library.nyu.edu/grads.

NYU Libraries Research Breakfast & Spring Classes for Grad Students

Hello from the NYU Libraries:

We have 2 spring programs to announce to help you “clean up” your research and organizational skills! Join us for a “Research Breakfast” or one of our annual “Spring Clean-up Workshops.” See more details below or register now.

1. Spring Research Breakfast

Come have breakfast, talk with our librarians about your project, and take care of those lingering research to-do list items. This informal event lasts for two hours, and you can come and go as you like during that time.

Thursday, March 8, 10:00am-12:00noon
Bobst Library
10th-floor Graduate Research Exchange (northwest corner)

2. Spring “Clean Up” Workshops for Grad Students
The NYU Libraries are holding a series of workshops and clinics especially for graduate students, led by expert librarians. These sessions focus on core research skills like:

* Identifying key resources in your discipline
* Organizing your research using an easy personal database called RefWorks
* Finding and ordering research materials from other institutions
* …And much more

Workshops will be held March 14-21. Find all the details and sign up at http://library.nyu.edu/grads.

RSVP! Ph.D. Workshop and a New Ph.D. Application Bootcamp This Spring

Dear students:

In addition to our semi-annual Ph.D. workshop, which is intended to provide an informational introduction to doctoral degrees and the Ph.D. application process in general, Draper will also be offering a multi-session Ph.D. Application Bootcamp in April. Designed by Professor Theresa MacPhail, this Bootcamp is an in-depth intensive that will guide students in selecting the right Ph.D. programs to apply to, as well as crafting strong, distinctive applications to each.
More information about both the Ph.D. workshop (in March) and April’s Bootcamp are below; please RSVP for both atdraper.program@nyu.edu.
Important: Students who wish to participate in the Ph.D. Application Bootcamp *must* attend the Ph.D. workshop in March.

***
Spring 2012 Ph.D. Application Workshop
Friday, March 23
6:00 – 8:00 PM
Draper Map Room


Led by Professors Mario Caro and Amber Musser

This workshop is a mini-orientation session geared towards students who are either considering a Ph.D. or those who are already in the early stages of the application process. It is also relevant to students who are interested in general information regarding doctoral degrees and those who need some guidance as to what they should be prepared for in terms of the application process. Some general issues that will be tackled are:

* How do I know if a PhD is right for me?
* Setting realistic expectations of the PhD process and future career trajectories.
* Choosing a department as well as a university that is a good fit for me.
*What to expect in terms of the contents and deadlines for a PhD application.
* Using Draper as a resource for making decisions about a PhD and a career in academia.

We encourage all Draper students who are interested in future doctoral studies and have questions regarding the same to attend this workshop.

***

Ph.D. Application Bootcamp

A multi-session workshop led by Theresa MacPhail


*Please note: Students *must* attend the Ph.D. Application Workshop on March 23 in order to take part in this bootcamp series. See the Draper website for more information on the Ph.D. workshop.*


Session One (Optional): Friday, April 6, 2012: 5:00 – 6:00 PM (Draper Map Room)

Students who cannot attend this session should email Prof. MacPhail directly (tmm260@nyu.edu) so that they will be able to prepare for session two.


Session Two: Friday, April 20, 2012: 6:00 – 8:00 PM (Draper Map Room)

___

So you know that you want to get a Ph.D. You’ve attended the Ph.D. workshop at Draper and you’ve decided that academic life is right for you. Now the real fun begins. . .

You need to put together a great application, an application that sings your praises to admissions committees, that entices them into offering you a great admissions package. But, in order to do that, you have to know a few things first.


This bootcamp is designed for students who know that they want to go on to doctoral study. Over the course of two sessions, we will prepare you for the PhD application process by helping you to get your research proposals in shape. These personal statements are the keystones of your entire application; we can’t stress enough how much they matter to your success in gaining entry to the program(s) of your choice.


In session one of the series, we’ll spend some time discussing what you’ll need to do for session two. In sum, you’ll need to come to session one with some idea of the discipline(s) you’re interested in. You’ll also need to have some idea about the schools/cities/programs in which you can envision yourself for the next 5-7 years of your academic life. Then, we’ll discuss strategy for PhD applications and homework for the next session. WARNING: This is a bootcamp. There will be a large amount of research, prep work, and writing for session two.


In the second session, you will be responsible for bringing a draft of a personal statement with a semi-fleshed out research project to class for work-shopping and peer review. In addition, you must bring a list of your top 5 schools/programs and know which professors you might want to work with – or who might want to work with you – at each school. You should be able to explain the differences among the programs (each school typically has its own approach to the disciplines) and how you’ll craft a slightly different personal statement for each unique program.

Spring 2012 Thesis Workshop

Save the Date!
Master’s Thesis Workshop
Friday, February 24
5:30 – 7:30 PM

Led by Professors Theresa MacPhail and Steven Moga

This workshop is primarily intended for students who are in the early phases of thesis preparation, but also for those at later stages of the process. Students will receive guidance on how to refine their topics and narrow the scope of their theses, and on some of the basic mechanics of writing up their work.


RSVP’s are appreciated–call 212.998.8070 or email draper.program@nyu.edu to let us know if you’ll be attending.